Election update: Republicans expected to gain seats in the state House

By | November 13, 2014 | Comments

Four Democratic incumbents appear to have lost their seats in the Washington State House, while another race remains too close to call.

Counties across the state still have about 68,000 ballots to process, but some candidates have conceded races in which the outcome is not expected to change. Results will be certified by counties on Nov. 25.

Here’s an update on the races:

Democratic state Rep. Kathy Haigh conceded the race to Republican challenger Dan Griffey on Thursday, with the latest election results showing Haigh trailing by 512 votes. Haigh was first elected to the 35th District seat in 1998. Griffey, a firefighter from Allyn, claimed victory on his campaign Facebook page, writing “I appreciate Kathy Haigh’s sacrifice in serving our district and was very touched by her call this afternoon.”

In Southwest Washington, Democratic state Rep. Monica Stonier has lost her re-election bid to Republican businesswoman Lynda Wilson. Ballot tallies show Wilson winning by 1,147 votes. “Although it has not been certified, our numbers have continued to rise and my opponent has graciously conceded this race,” Wilson wrote on her campaign website earlier this week.

Republican Michelle Caldier, a dentist in Kitsap County, claimed victory on Saturday in the tight race against Democratic incumbent Rep. Larry Seaquist. Caldier is leading by about 600 votes.

Political newcomer Republican Melanie Stambaugh held onto to her election night lead over Democratic Rep. Dawn Morrell, winning by more than 3,500 votes. At 24, Stambaugh will be the youngest member of the state House.

An open House seat remains too close to call in the 28th District. Democrat Christine Kilduff is leading by 279 votes over Republican Paul Wagemann. They are competing for the seat formerly held by Democratic Rep. Tami Green, who lost a Senate bid against Republican Steve O’Ban.

If the election results hold up, Democrats will have a 51-47 vote majority in the state House. That’s down from a 55-vote majority.

Several close Senate races have not changed since election night, with the Republican-led Majority Coalition Caucus expected to hold onto control of the Senate with a 26-23 vote majority over Democrats.
Categories: Election

Former state leaders mobilize to save sinking USS Olympia

By | November 12, 2014 | Comments

The USS Olympia took part in two major wars, carried home the body of the Unknown Soldier and is one of the last surviving Naval ships of its era.

It’s also falling into disrepair, and will be sent to the scrapyard unless enough money is raised to save it.

A group in Washington is stepping up to help save the vessel — and by doing so, they hope to make amends for what they say is more than 100 years of neglect by its namesake.

“I think it is almost disgraceful that we as a state have not taken more pride in this vessel that is named after our state’s Capitol, and it is in this kind of condition without us taking any steps to help out,” said former Secretary of State Sam Reed, one of several prominent state leaders lending their names to the effort.

The USS Olympia is at the Independence Seaport Museum in Philadelphia, where it is at risk of sinking into the Delaware River. A spokesperson for the museum said they are doing what they can to raise money to repair the ship — including hosting private events and ghost tours on deck — but it isn’t enough.

The ship’s steel hull is rusting and needs to be replaced, at a cost of $7 million. It will cost another $3 million to replace its leaking wood deck — and the costs go up from there.

The Washington Friends of the USS Olympia (FOTO) formed to support the fundraising effort. Leaders include Reed, former governors Dan Evans and Chris Gregoire, former Secretaries of State Ralph Munro, former Chief Justice Gerry Alexander and retired U.S. Navy admiral Tom Hayward.

The USS Olympia was the Navy’s most modern warship when it was first commissioned in 1895, said FOTO’s secretary Les Eldridge. It’s now the oldest steel-hulled ship still afloat.

It served as the flagship under Cmdr. George Dewey, and helped win the first victory of the 1898 Spanish-American War at the Battle of Manila Bay in the Philippines. The USS Olympia also escorted convoys during World War I, and was tasked with returning the body of the Unknown Soldier from the battlefields of France. It was decommissioned in 1922.

Washington state financed a silver tea service for the ship back in the early 1900s that is now on display at the Governor’s Mansion, Eldridge said. “That’s the last thing we’ve done for her in 114 years,” he said. “And we’ve never done anything else to support her. So we’re trying to make amends.”

Go to navycruiserolympia.com for more information.

Watch the segment below:

Round-up of early election results: GOP retains control of State Senate, gun control measure wins

By | November 5, 2014 | Comments

Early voting results show the GOP-led Majority Coalition Caucus is likely to remain in control of the Washington State Senate. A Democratic majority remains in the House, although Republicans appear to have picked up a few seats.

Here’s a look at some of the key legislative races:

Sen. Andy Hill, the Senate’s lead Republican budget writer from Redmond, appears to be holding onto his seat, with 53 percent of the vote. Democratic challenger Matt Isenhower has 47 percent of the vote.

Republican Sen. Steve O’Ban of Tacoma was defeating his Democratic challenger, Rep. Tami Green, 55 to 45 percent.

In Federal Way, Republican Mark Miloscia is in the lead with 56 percent. His Democratic opponent, Shari Song, has 44 percent. The seat become open earlier this year when Democratic Sen. Tracey Eide decided not to run for reelection.

Republican Sen. Pam Roach fought a bitter contest against fellow Republican Rep. Cathy Dahlquist in the 31st District. Results show Roach in the lead, 53 to 47 percent.

Sen. Tim Sheldon, a Democrat who joined with the Republicans to form the Majority Coalition Caucus in the Senate, appears to be holding onto his seat. Sheldon is ahead with 55 percent of the vote against Democrat Irene Bowling.

Democratic Rep. Cyrus Habib is winning the 48th District seat by 64 percent. He will succeed Sen. Rodney Tom, who was one of two Democrats, along with Sheldon, who joined the GOP-led Majority Coalition Caucus.

In Spokane, Republican Sen. Michael Baumgartner was leading his Democratic opponent Rich Cowan, 57 to 43 percent.

Republican Sen. Doug Ericksen of Ferndale also appears to have a comfortable lead, winning 59 percent of the vote over his Democratic challenger Seth Fleetwood.

In the state House, a few seats appear poised to switch parties.

Democratic Rep. Monica Stonier of Vancouver is trailing behind her Republican challenger Lynda Wilson. Wilson is ahead 51 to 49 percent.

In the 25th District, Republican Melanie Stambaugh, a 24-year-old newcomer to politics, is leading against Democratic Rep. Dawn Morrell. Stambaugh, who would become the youngest member of the Legislature if elected, is ahead with 53 percent of the vote.

One race that is too close to call is between Democratic Rep. Larry Seaquist and Republican Michelle Caldier, a dentist who is running for office for the first time. Caldier is currently ahead by just 78 votes.

Another tight race is shaping up between Democratic Rep. Kathy Haigh and Republican Dan Griffey, a firefighter who is challenging her for the third time. Haigh has a slight lead of 223 votes.

Rep. Roger Freeman, a Democratic lawmaker from Federal Way, died last week after a battle with cancer. His name remained on the ballot, and he appears to be winning the election against Republican Jack Dovey, 53 to 47 percent. If Freeman wins, Democrats will appoint a replacement.

Republican Rep. Jesse Young is leading in the 26th District, which includes parts of Bremerton, Port Orchard and Gig Harbor. He faced opposition from emergency room doctor and former Democratic Sen. Nathan Schlicher. Young was ahead 53 to 47 percent.

You can see all the legislative results on the Secretary of State’s website.

Voters also decided on three initiatives:

Voters approved Initiative 594, a gun control measure that expands background checks on gun sales in the state. The initiative was winning with 60 percent of the vote. The counter measure, Initiative 591, which bars the state from adopting background checks stricter than national standards, was being rejected by 55 percent.

A classroom size initiative is still too close to call. Initiative 1351 would require smaller classroom sizes, and the “no” votes were leading by 51 percent to 49 percent of “yes” votes.

Categories: Education

On ‘The Impact’ tonight: Election results and wolf update

By | November 5, 2014 | Comments

On this week’s edition of “The Impact,” we wrap up the election results and look at how it will shape the 2015 Legislature.

Reporters Jordan Schrader of The News Tribune and Jerry Cornfield of The Everett Herald join us to talk about the results of key legislative races, and what it means for the upcoming session.

Plus, David Ware of the Dept. of Fish and Wildlife talks about the latest tensions over Washington’s wolf recovery effort.

The department is seeking a dozen citizen candidates to serve a two-year term on the Wolf Advisory Group, a committee created last year to advise the department on wolf recovery and management. The group currently has nine members representing ranchers, wolf advocates and hunters. The term for the current members expires at the end of the year.

Applications must be submitted in writing and include the following:
  • The applicant or nominee’s name, address, telephone number, and email address
  • People or groups making nominations must also submit their own names and contact information
  • The candidate’s relevant experience, organizational affiliations, and reasons why he or she would be an effective advisory group member
  • His or her familiarity with Washington’s Wolf Conservation and Management Plan and current wolf recovery status
  • His or her experience in collaborating with people who have different values

Nominations must be postmarked by 5 p.m. on Nov. 14 and addressed to Dave Ware, Game Division Manager at the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 600 Capitol Way N., Olympia, WA 98501-1091 or via email to David.Ware@dfw.wa.gov.

Also on the show, learn about the contents of hundreds of unclaimed safe deposit boxes that will be auctioned in November.

Updated: Watch the show below:

Categories: TVW
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TVW election night show starts at 8 p.m. Tuesday

By | November 3, 2014 | Comments

TVW will be live on election night with results for all the legislative and statewide races.

Tune in on Tuesday, Nov. 4 starting at 8 p.m.

As the numbers roll in, host Anita Kissee will be discussing the results on-set with Republican and Democratic analysts.

We’ll also have live phone interviews with candidates and legislative leaders, and we’ll be sharing the latest Twitter and Facebook posts related to the state elections on air.

This year, voters will be deciding which party should control the state Senate. The chamber is currently controlled by the mostly Republican Majority Coalition Caucus, while the House is controlled by Democrats.

Voters will also be deciding on an initiative which would require smaller classroom sizes, as well as two competing gun measures: I-594, which would expand the state’s background check requirements, and I-591, which would ban the state from requiring background checks that are stricter than those imposed by the federal government.

You can watch TVW’s live webcast from your computer at this link. To find TVW on television in your area, check out this channel guide.

Categories: Election, TVW

State Rep. Roger Freeman dies after battle with cancer

By | October 29, 2014 | Comments

Rep. Roger Freeman, a Democratic freshman lawmaker from Federal Way, has died after a yearlong battle with cancer, according to The News Tribune.

Freeman, 48, was diagnosed with colon cancer last year. He is survived by his wife and two children.

Gov. Jay Inslee released a statement saying Freeman was “fully committed to his work despite the battle he faced against cancer, and was one of the most professional, eloquent and kind-hearted legislators I’ve had the pleasure of working with.”

Freeman was running for re-election against Republican Jack Dovey in the 30th Legislative District.

The Secretary of State’s Office said that if Freeman wins the election, it will result in a vacant seat that must be filled through the standard appointment process. Three candidates would be nominated by 30th Legislative District Democrats, and the King and Pierce County Councils would jointly select a replacement.

“Though Rep. Freeman’s time in the Legislature was short, I got to know him well enough to know that he loved his family deeply and missed them every day when he was here working on behalf of the people of our district,” said retiring state Sen. Tracey Eide of Federal Way.

Categories: WA House

On ‘The Impact’ this week: Millennial voters and charter school lawsuit

By | October 29, 2014 | Comments

On this week’s edition of “The Impact,” meet millennial voters — and hear their thoughts about what they are voting on this year.

Guests include Washington Director of Elections Lori Augino.

Plus, learn more about the legal challenge to Washington’s new charter school law as it reaches the state Supreme Court.

We’ll also have details about the final “free day” of the year at Washington State Parks.

The show airs Wednesdays at 7 & 10 p.m. Updated: Watch the show below.

Categories: TVW

Washington’s charter school law debated in front of the state Supreme Court

By | October 28, 2014 | Comments

The Washington Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday about the constitutionality of the state’s new charter school law.

A lawyer for the coalition that is suing to stop the charter school law argued that charter schools are “fundamentally different” than traditional “common schools” and should not be funded with certain taxpayer money.

“There is a requirement, in our view, in the state constitution that says when you appropriate money for common schools, it’s got to be used for common schools,” said Paul Lawrence, who represents a coalition that includes the Washington Education Association, El Centro De La Raza and the League of Women Voters of Washington.

The tax revenue collected from various sources to fund common schools is constitutionally protected, Lawrence argued, and can’t be used for charter schools.

State attorney Rebecca Glasgow told the justices the state’s public school system must adapt to the changing needs of students.

“When the voters approved Initiative 1240, they added charter schools to a long list of existing non-traditional, public education programs — many of which are run by school districts, but some of which are not,” Glasgow said.

“This court should hold that charter schools are common schools,” she said. “But even if they weren’t, they can be operated with unrestricted general fund education money.”

Approved by voters in 2012, the charter school law allows up to 40 charter schools to open over the next five years. So far, ten charter schools have been authorized.

The first charter school opened this fall in Seattle, eight schools are enrolling students for next year and one school is slated to open its doors in 2016, according to the Washington State Charter Schools Association. The association’s CEO Thomas Franta issued a statement saying he was “confident” the court will uphold the law, which he described as one of the strongest in the country.

The Supreme Court will issue a decision at a later date. TVW taped the arguments — watch it below.

Charter school law before the Washington Supreme Court on Tuesday

By | October 27, 2014 | Comments

The Washington Supreme Court will hear arguments Tuesday in a case that challenges the constitutionality of Initiative 1240, a measure approved by voters in 2012 that allows 40 public charter schools to open in Washington state over five years.

TVW will air the arguments live on Tuesday, Oct. 28 shortly after 2 p.m.

A coalition that includes the Washington Education Association, El Centro De La Raza and the League of Women Voters of Washington is seeking to have the charter school law declared unconstitutional.

The coalition writes in court filings that “education is the Legislature’s paramount duty” under Article IX of the state Constitution, and lawmakers must offer a “uniform basic education” though taxpayer-funded “common schools.”

The group argues the initiative diverts public funds for “experimental charter schools,” which it says are operated by private organizations and “not required to follow most of the uniform state laws” that apply to common schools. The schools are also outside the supervision of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, the coalition says.

State Attorney General Bob Ferguson wrote in response that plaintiffs are asking the court to “override the will of Washington’s voters based on an extreme, antiquated approach to Article IX.”

Ferguson wrote: “Moreover, plaintiffs ask this court to adhere rigidly to the framers’ supposed (but unstated) intent, while ignoring that the framers explicitly distinguished between ‘common schools’ and ‘high schools.’ Today, no one – not even plaintiffs – questions the legislature’s decision to classify high schools as common schools, and that Article IX is flexible enough to allow that classification.”

Read all the court filings here.

A King County Superior Court judge last year upheld most of the charter school law, but ruled that some parts are unconstitutional. Judge Jean Rietschel said in her ruling that a “charter school cannot be defined as a common school because it is not under the control of the voters of the school district.” Since it is not a common school, she said it does not qualify for certain state money, such construction funds.

The Washington Supreme Court agreed to review the case.

On TVW this week: Charter school lawsuit, carbon emissions task force

By | October 27, 2014 | Comments

Monday Oct. 27 at 10:30 a.m.: TVW is live with the Joint Energy Supply and Energy Conservation Committee. The agenda includes policy recommendations to the 2015 Legislature.

Tuesday Oct. 28 at 10 a.m.: The Carbon Emissions Reductions Task Force will hold a meeting to discuss the draft report on taskforce recommendations. TVW will webcast the meeting.

Tuesday Oct. 28 at 2:30 p.m.: The Washington Supreme Court will hear arguments about whether the law passed by voters allowing charter schools violates the state constitution. TVW will be live on television and the web.

Wednesday Oct. 29 at 10 a.m.: TVW is live with the House Finance Committee as they hold a work session on city and county fiscal sustainability.

Categories: TVW

State approves coverage for transgender people

By | October 22, 2014 | Comments

Healthcare plans for state workers will soon include benefits for transgender services, including gender reassignment surgery.

The state Public Employees Benefits Board voted unanimously at a special meeting Wednesday to cover benefits for gender dysphoria, a condition in which a person doesn’t believe their gender identity conforms with their birth gender.

Starting January 1, 2015, all health care plans administered by the state board will include benefits for “covered non-surgical health care services, covered prescriptions, and covered surgical services for the treatment of gender dysphoria.” The board administers healthcare plans for state employees, their family members and retirees.

Kathryn Mahan of Puyallup has been a government employee for 28 years, and told the board she plans to take advantage of the transgender services next year.

After the meeting, she said the board’s decision was “life changing.” Without coverage, surgery would cost $20,000. “I never thought this would be possible,” Mahan said.

Board members said they were pleased at how quickly the services will be covered. Transgender advocates first approached the board in the spring. “There was a lot of interest in the transgender benefits,” said PEBB division director Lou McDermott.

Categories: Olympia, State agency news

On ‘The Impact’ this week: Backpage lawsuit and Ebola outbreak

By | October 22, 2014 | Comments

On “The Impact” this week, hear from the family of one of the underage girls who was trafficked for sex on the Backpage website. A lawyer for the girl argued before the Washington Supreme Court on Tuesday that the website is responsible for some of its content. Backpage contends that it is immune under a federal communications law.

Also on the show, details about the new screening measures in place to monitor travelers coming to Washington from Ebola outbreak zones. Host Anita Kissee interviews Kathy Lofy, the communicable diseases epidemiologist with Washington’s Dept. of Health.

More information about Washington’s efforts to stop the Ebola outbreak can be found on the department’s website.

The show airs Wednesday Oct. 22 at 7 & 10 p.m. We’ll post a link here once it is available online.

Categories: TVW

Backpage sex trafficking case argued before state Supreme Court

By | October 21, 2014 | Comments

Protestors rally against Backpage in front of the Supreme Court

A lawyer for Backpage.com argued before the Washington Supreme Court on Tuesday that the website should be granted “complete immunity” from prosecution because it did not write the online ads that resulted in the sex trafficking of three underage girls.

Backpage maintains that the website is immune under the federal Communications Decency Act, which says that an Internet service provider is not liable for the content posted by users.

“It’s clear that Backpage did not create or develop the ads that allegedly harmed the plaintiffs,” Backpage attorney Jim Grant told the court.

But a lawyer for the three victims says that Backpage did play a role in developing the ads.

Erik Bauer told justices that Backpage should be considered an “information content provider” because of its posting guidelines, which he said help traffickers write sex ads that won’t get flagged by law enforcement.

The guidelines include suggestions such as “don’t advertise in time increments of 15 minutes,” and offer a way for pimps to pay for the ads with untraceable prepaid credit cards, Bauer said.

“These so-called posting rules that are on the Backpage website are actually instructions to pimps on how to post an ad that works,” Bauer said.

Grant countered that claim, saying virtually every website has posting guidelines. “Backpage’s rules prohibit illegal content and prohibit improper content, just as Craigslist rules do, just as Facebook rules do, just as Microsoft Windows rules do,” Grant said.

The three victims in the case were between the ages of 13 and 15 when they were trafficked.

The mother of one of the girls told TVW after the hearing that her daughter ran away from home at the age of 15, took a bus to Seattle and within 36 hours was trafficked for sex by a pimp who used Backpage to sell her multiple times a day.

“She’s doing much better today,” her mother said. The pimp was arrested, and she said the next step was to go after the facilitator — Backpage. “I felt it was time Section 230 (of the Communications Decency Act) was looked at,” she said.

The justices will release a decision at a later date. TVW taped the hearing — watch it below:

Washington Supreme Court set to hear Backpage sex trafficking case

By | October 20, 2014 | Comments

The Washington Supreme Court will hear arguments Tuesday in a lawsuit brought against Backpage.com by representatives of three teenagers who say they were trafficked for sex on the website.

Lawyers for the sex trafficking victims allege that Backpage is liable for creating an online marketplace for sex, and for contributing to some of the content of the ads by posting certain guidelines. Backpage argues it is immune under the 1996 federal Communications Decency Act, which says that an Internet service provider is not liable for the content posted by users.

TVW will air the arguments live at 2:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 21.

The victims were runaways between the ages of 13 through 15 when they were initially trafficked on Backpage by a pimp, according to court filings. The victims allege that Backpage never attempted to verify their ages, and they say they were raped numerous times as a result of the online escort ads that were posted and paid for by the pimp.

They argue in court filings that Backpage contributed to the content of the ads by “providing phoney posting rules and content requirements to instruct sex traffickers not to use certain words and graphics in order to avoid growing scrutiny by the public and law enforcement.”

The pimp who trafficked the girls was convicted in 2011 and sentenced to 26 1/2 years in prison.

Backpage attorney Liz McDougall told TVW it was premature to comment on the lawsuit. However, in an email she said that Backpage fights child trafficking with “approximately 100 staff dedicated to operating a 24/7 triple-tier prevention system (including an automated filter and two levels of human review).”

McDougall said “identifying and vilifying a single U.S. website (previously craigslist, now Backpage.com) as the cause of the problem and the key to the solution are ill-founded and unproductive,” and will result in children being trafficked on offshore websites that are outside the jurisdiction of U.S. law enforcement.

A Pierce County Superior Court judge denied a motion by Backpage to dismiss the case under the Communications Decency Act. Backpage appealed, and the Washington Supreme Court accepted review of the court’s decision.

If the Supreme Court agrees with the victims, then Backpage could be denied immunity and required to pay damages, according to the state Attorney General’s Office, which filed a “friend of the court” brief in the lawsuit against Backpage.

Read all the court filings here.

On ‘The Impact’ this week: Senate races, voting history

By | October 15, 2014 | Comments

On this week’s edition of “The Impact,” we break down the state Senate races that are most in play.

On-set guests Republican Sen. Bruce Dammeier and Democratic Sen. Kevin Ranker talk about the implications the races will have on the balance of the state Senate, which is currently controlled by the mostly Republican Majority Coalition Caucus.

Plus, a look into the state archives to see the first voters’ pamphlet dating back 100 years. The Secretary of State’s office has archived all voters’ pamphlets since 1914 at this link.

Update: The show is now online — watch it below:

Categories: TVW

Clarification on the League of Women Voters of Washington

By | October 14, 2014 | Comments

TVW would like to clarify the position of the League of Women Voters of Washington. In our question to Sen. John Braun on the Oct. 8 edition of “The Impact,” we stated the league was opposed to Initiative 1351, which would reduce class sizes. The league’s board voted to take no position, and neither supports nor opposes the initiative.

The following is a statement from their website: LWVWA.org.

“Initiative 1351 – The League of Women Voters of Washington does not take a position on this initiative.This measure would direct the legislature to allocate funds to reduce class sizes and increase staffing support for students in all K-12 grades, with additional class-size reductions and staffing increases in high-poverty schools. Although the LWVWA has studied K-12 education numerous times (1968, 1975, 1977, 1991, 1997 and 2009), it has not studied class size as a way “to ensure that every child regardless of race, color, gender, national origin, age, sexual orientation, or disability is ready to learn (K-12 – 2). The League’s position on Initiative and Referendum supports having sponsors of these measures suggest ways to pay for them.Therefore the LWVWA Board voted to neither endorse nor oppose Initiative 1351.”
Categories: TVW

Ethics board votes to limit free meals for legislators

By | October 14, 2014 | Comments

Legislators cannot accept more than 12 free meals a year from lobbyists under a new rule adopted unanimously Tuesday by the Legislative Ethics Board.

Lawmakers are allowed to accept gifts of food or beverages on “infrequent occasions” if they are discussing legislative business. However, an investigation published last year by the AP and Northwest Public Radio found that legislators were accepting hundreds of meals worth thousands of dollars from lobbyists on a regular basis.

The ethics board held four meetings this year to define “infrequent” for the first time.

The new rule adopted Tuesday defines “infrequent” as 12 times per calendar year, and states that a qualifying meal could be a breakfast, lunch or dinner that includes food and beverages.

It also includes a number of exceptions — for example, a legislator is allowed to accept a free cup of coffee from a lobbyist. The rule also doesn’t apply to buffet-style events where attendance is related to the legislator’s official duties.

Read the draft rule here.

The new rule goes into effect Jan. 1, 2015. Watch today’s hearing at this link.

Categories: WA House, WA Senate
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Smaller class size initiative leading in Elway Poll

By | October 14, 2014 | Comments

Voters appear to be in support of an initiative that would require smaller class sizes in public schools.

The latest Elway Poll shows that 66 percent of voters said they would definitely or probably vote yes for Initiative 1351. Twenty four percent said they would definitely or probably vote no, and 11 percent remain undecided.

The ballot measure requires the Legislature to allocate funding for smaller class sizes over the next four years, starting with high poverty schools where half of the students receive free or reduced lunch.

The poll said the initiative showed support across demographics, although support waned when voters pay closer attention. “The more attention voters have paid, the less likely they are to support I-1351,” pollster H. Stuart Elway said.

Supporters say the measure would allow teachers to pay more attention to students and bring the state in line with national class size rankings. Opponents argue that the measure doesn’t say where the money would come from, and it displaces money that could be better spent.

TVW’s Video Voters Guide has statements from the proponents and opponents of the measure.

In 2000, Washington voters passed Initiative 728 requiring smaller class sizes, but the ballot measure was repealed by Legislature in 2012 because of lack of funding.

Categories: Election

On TVW this week: Ethics board, welfare program updates

By | October 13, 2014 | Comments

Here’s what we’re covering live on TVW this week:

Tuesday, Oct. 14 at noon: The Legislative Ethics Board is meeting to discuss and vote on a rule for how frequently lawmakers are allowed to accept free meals from lobbyists. TVW will air the meeting on television and the web.

Wednesday, Oct. 15 at 7 & 10 p.m.: On “The Impact,” we look at the battle over control of Washington’s Senate and why it matters so much this election. Plus, a rare glimpse into our state archives to see what Washingtonians voted on 100 years ago.

Thursday, Oct. 16 at 10 a.m.: The House Early Learning committee is holding a meeting to discuss child welfare court data. It will be broadcast live on television and on the web.

Thursday, Oct. 16 at 7 & 10 p.m.: On “Inside Olympia,” host Austin Jenkins interviews the proponents and opponents of the class size initiative, as well as the gun control initiative.

Friday, Oct. 17 at 9 a.m.: A health subcommittee is scheduled to get updates on two welfare programs, as well as a prescription drug initiative. Live on television and the web.

Friday, Oct. 17 at 1 p.m.: TVW will be live with the Citizens Tax Preference Commission.

Categories: TVW

Former TVW president Greg Lane to become Deputy Secretary of State

By | October 9, 2014 | Comments

Secretary of State Kim Wyman announced today that former TVW President and CEO Greg Lane will become Deputy Secretary of State.

Current deputy Mark Neary will become Assistant Secretary of State, succeeding Ken Raske, who will retire at the end of the year.

Lane joined TVW in 2008, and his last day as leader of the organization was Oct. 3. He previously worked as the deputy chief of staff and communications director for the Attorney General, and as the media services director at the House of Representatives.

From the Secretary of State’s press release:

Wyman noted that as a TVW board member, she had an opportunity see Lane’s administrative and policy skills in action. After Lane announced his departure from TVW, Wyman said she realized Lane would be an ideal fit for the Office of Secretary of State and asked him to come on board.

“I’m delighted that Greg will be our new Deputy Secretary and I know he brings energy, innovation and a commitment to excellence,” Wyman said. “As we look toward big changes at the State Library and State Archives and bringing our `A-Game’ to Elections, Corporations, Legacy Washington and our special programs, we will have a very strong leadership team to guide the way.”

Categories: TVW