Author Archive

More must be done to prevent oil spills in Washington, Inslee says

By | October 1, 2014 | 0 Comments

Gov. Jay Inslee says the state and federal government must do more to prevent oil spills from “outdated, inadequate and outright dangerous” trains that carry volatile Bakken crude oil across Washington state.

“These train cars were not designed to carry this product,” Inslee said at a press conference in Seattle on Wednesday. The governor is calling on the federal government to impose a speed limit of 30 miles per hour for trains that have not been updated to transport high-hazard materials, and 40 miles per hour once the train cars are upgraded.

“We don’t let speeding cars through our school zones,” he said. “We should not let speeding unsafe oil rail cars through Washington state cities.”

A train carrying Bakken crude oil derailed in Seattle in July as it was heading for a refinery at Anacortes, but it didn’t spill any oil. Inslee said the state “dodged a bullet” because the train was traveling at slow speeds.

Inslee also wants the federal government to shorten the two-year time period it is proposing for rail companies to upgrade train cars. “That is too long,” he said. “A one year window should provide adequate time for rail car upgrades that are already underway.”

In a letter to U.S. Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx, the governor urged a “quicker phase out of the T-111 tank cars that are inadequate for transporting high-hazard materials,” saying the cars should not be used to transport Bakken crude after October 2016.

The Dept. of Ecology released a preliminary report on Wednesday that makes recommendations on how the state can improve rail safety at a time the state is seeing increased carloads of oil and coal from Montana and North Dakota.

The report includes more than $12 million in budget recommendations, including hiring extra rail inspectors, providing equipment and training for local first responders and firefighters, and developing new geographic response plans for oil spills.

Inslee said he would use the recommendations to submit a plan to the Legislature during the 2015 session.

The public can submit comments about the initial recommendations online or at two public meetings: Oct. 28 in Spokane, or Oct. 30 in Olympia.

TVW taped the press conference. Watch it below:

On TVW: Food safety hearing, revenue forecast & health benefit exchange update

By | September 15, 2014 | 0 Comments

Here’s what TVW is live with this week:

Tuesday, Sept. 16 at 9 a.m.: House Agriculture and Natural Resources committee is holding a work session on food security and new federal food rules. TVW will be live on television and the web with the hearing.

Wednesday, Sept. 17 at 10 a.m.: House Appropriations Subcommittee on Education is having a work session on early education. The meeting will be broadcast live on television and the web.

Wednesday, Sept. 17 a 7 & 10 p.m.: On “The Impact” this week: Finding adequate treatment and housing for Washington’s mentally ill patients. Plus, how the new military alliance will work to preserve the military’s economic presence in our state.

Thursday, Sept. 18 at 10 a.m.: A health care committee will get an update on the health benefit exchange. Watch live on TVW, or at this link.

Thursday, Sept. 18 at 1:30 p.m.: The Economic and Revenue Forecast Council will release its revenue forecast. Live on TVW, and the web.

Thursday, Sept. 18 at 7 & 10 p.m.: On “Inside Olympia” this week: What are the reasons behind record Columbia River salmon runs? Is wildlife poaching a problem in Washington? Host Austin Jenkins interviews a leader from the state Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.

Friday, Sept. 19 at 1 p.m.: TVW will be live with the Citizens Tax Preference Commission.

 

Categories: TVW

Supreme Court holds Legislature in contempt for education funding

By | September 11, 2014 | 0 Comments

The Washington Supreme Court is holding the Legislature in contempt for failing to submit a plan detailing how the state will pay for public schools through 2018.

However, the court stopped short of imposing sanctions. It is giving the Legislature the “opportunity to purge the contempt” if lawmakers submit an education funding plan by the end of the 2015 session.

“If the contempt is not purged by adjournment of the 2015 legislature, the court will reconvene and impose sanctions or other remedial measures,” Chief Justice Barbara Madsen wrote in the unanimous order released Thursday.

The Supreme Court ruled in the 2012 McCleary decision that Washington state was not meeting its constitutional duty to fund K-12 education. The court has since demanded regular updates from the Legislature, including an order asking lawmakers to submit a plan in April explaining how the state will pay for basic education.

The Legislature failed to submit that plan, spurring a contempt hearing last week in which lawyers for the state asked for more time.

“The state assured the court that a contempt order is not necessary to get the legislature’s attention, that school funding is the number one issue on the legislature’s agenda, and that the 2015 session will provide the best opportunity to take meaningful action on the matter,” Madsen wrote.

“The court has no doubt that it already has the legislature’s ‘attention.’ But that is not the purpose of a contempt order. Rather, contempt is the means by which a court enforces compliance with its lawful orders when they are not followed,” the court said.

The order will be posted on the court’s website.

Categories: Education, McCleary

Oil train safety on ‘The Impact’

By | September 10, 2014 | 0 Comments

On this week’s edition of “The Impact,” host Anita Kissee looks at the controversy surrounding oil trains traveling through Washington, and what the state is doing to prepare.

The state Dept. of Ecology is conducting an oil transportation study to look at risks to health and safety, as well as environmental impacts. The Marine and Rail Oil Transportation Study is due to the governor and Legislature in March 2015.

Also on the show: A look inside Washington’s first charter school to see the unique way it’s educating children. Plus, there is a new way for parents to find out what toxic chemicals are in things like children’s toys with an online database of all consumer products tested by the Ecology department.

Watch the show below:

Categories: Oil Trains

Supreme Court hears arguments in contempt hearing related to school funding

By | September 3, 2014 | 0 Comments

A lawyer for the state argued Wednesday that the Washington Supreme Court should not hold the Legislature in contempt for failing to come up with a plan to fund schools because it would set back progress.

“Finding contempt and ordering a sanction could impede progress toward the ultimate resolution — the ultimate funding of schools — rather than promote it,” deputy solicitor general Alan Copsey told justices during a show-cause hearing.

The state Supreme Court is considering holding the Legislature in contempt for not complying with a court order related to the 2012 McCleary ruling, which found the state is not meeting its constitutional duty to fund K-12 education.

The court ordered the Legislature to come up with a detailed plan in April explaining how it will pay for schools through 2018. The Legislature failed to submit that plan, spurring Wednesday’s hearing.

Copsey asked the court to wait until after the 2015 session to give lawmakers time to write an operating budget and pass legislation to fund education.

“This court should give the 2015 Legislature the opportunity to act, but stand ready should legislators stumble in that duty,” said Copsey.

Justice Charles Wiggins questioned why justices should believe the Legislature will do things differently this time.

Copsey responded by saying the Legislature was not “thumbing its nose” at the court order, but it simply couldn’t agree on how to fund schools. He says he hopes legislators will come to an agreement in 2015.

An attorney for the McCleary family and other plaintiffs urged the court to take action against the Legislature.

“Call a spade a spade. They’re in contempt, don’t be afraid to say the word ‘contempt’,”  attorney Thomas Ahearne told justices.

Ahearne said the court should demand the Legislature submit a plan by the end of 2014. If lawmakers fail to submit a plan, he said the court should step in with sanctions.

“The reason for a sanction is to coerce…the person who is not complying to actually comply,” he said.

The Supreme Court will respond at a later date. TVW taped the show-cause hearing — watch it below.

Categories: Education, McCleary

TVW president Greg Lane stepping down

By | August 28, 2014 | 0 Comments

TVW President and CEO Greg Lane is stepping down from his position, effective Sept. 30.

Lane joined TVW in 2008. He is the third president in TVW’s history, succeeding Cindy Zehnder and founding president Denny Heck.

During Lane’s tenure, TVW expanded its web services to make meetings more accessible to the public. All hearings and meetings recorded by TVW are now available on the organization’s website, and viewers can search, highlight and share TVW video, as well as track issues and access legislative documents.

Lane also led efforts to enhance the produced programs at the station. TVW won three Emmy Awards from the Northwest Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences in the last two years. In 2013, TVW won the Walter Cronkite Award for Excellence in Television Political Journalism.

The education resource Teach With TVW was expanded under Lane’s guidance, including the creation of Capitol Classroom, which each year teaches more than 300 middle and high school students how to participate in the legislative process.

“TVW was established because citizens deserve to be able to watch their government work, no matter where they live in our state,” Lane said. “I’m very proud of the improvements TVW has made over the last six years to increase that access, as well as help people better understand the issues and how to participate in the process.”

TVW’s Board of Directors is launching a search to fill the position.

Categories: TVW

McCleary school funding hearing set for Sept. 3, TVW will carry live

By | August 28, 2014 | 0 Comments

The Washington Supreme Court is ordering lawyers for the state to appear before justices to explain why the Legislature should not be held in contempt for failing to provide a complete plan for funding education.

TVW will air the hearing live on television at 2 p.m. on Sept. 3. It will also be live webcast at this link.

The state Supreme Court ruled in the McCleary case that the state is not fulfilling its obligation to fully fund education. The court has demanded regular updates from the Legislature since the 2012 ruling, and earlier this year the court gave lawmakers an April 30 deadline to explain how the state will pay for schools through the 2018 school year.

Legislators submitted a report by the deadline, but it didn’t include a plan. The report instead asked the Supreme Court to give “deep consideration” to the action taken by lawmakers this year, and recognize that “2015 is the next and most critical year for the Legislature to reach the grand agreement” to pay for education.

The plaintiffs in the McCleary case filed a brief this month asking the Supreme Court to take action if lawmakers don’t have a funding plan by the end of the year.

The court issued a show-cause order for the state’s lawyers to appear before the court to “address why the state should not be held in contempt for violation of this court’s order” that directed the Legislature to submit a complete plan for funding education.

Categories: Courts, Education, McCleary

Test scores hold steady, but majority of schools fail to meet federal standards

By | August 27, 2014 | 0 Comments

Statewide school test scores released Wednesday show students are performing about the same on math and reading tests as in previous years. More than 90 percent of students in the class of 2014 passed graduation tests, the same as last year.

But about 1,900 schools in Washington — or 88 percent — failed to meet adequate yearly progress under federal standards. The state must comply with federal No Child Left Behind standards this year after losing its waiver.

“We had to go back to a law that Congress knows doesn’t make sense anymore,” said Superintendent of Public Instruction Randy Dorn at a news conference Wednesday. Federal officials revoked the waiver because the state Legislature did not pass a bill that would have changed teacher evaluations to incorporate standardized test scores.

“By losing our waiver, we’ve had to do some things that are ridiculous, stupid, ineffective, waste of resources and accomplished zero,” Dorn said. He cited the effort that went into sending mandatory letters to parents in failing school districts notifying them of the status. The letters were sent out over the last two weeks.

No Child Left Behind requires 100 percent of students to pass reading and math by 2014.

Reading and math scores for Washington students in grades 3-10 show only slight changes from the previous year, except for a 5.9 percent drop in 7th grade math scores and a 5.4 percent increase in reading scores for 8th graders.

“We’ve stayed kind of steady the last three years,” Dorn said. “Which is probably, in my mind, good news.”

Full results are available on OSPI’s website here.

TVW taped Wednesday’s press conference. Watch it below.

Categories: Education

Round-up of Tuesday’s primary election results

By | August 6, 2014 | 0 Comments

Here’s a round-up of some of the highlights from Tuesday’s primary election results. Washington’s top-two primary system means the top two vote-getters advance to the Nov. 4 general election regardless of party affiliation.

Republican Sen. Pam Roach of Auburn holds a slim lead in a close contest with Republican challenger Rep. Cathy Dahlquist, 40 percent to 39.2 percent. The 31st Legislative District race has become one of the state’s most contentious showdowns, defined by a barrage of accusations and personal attacks.

Sen. Tim Sheldon is one of two conservative Democrats who joined forces with Republicans to form the Senate Majority Coalition Caucus. Tuesday night’s results show Sheldon in second place with 33 percent of the vote, trailing behind Democrat Irene Bowling who garnered 35 percent of the vote. A third candidate, Republican Travis Couture, is not far behind with 32 percent of the vote.

The other Democrat who joined with Republicans, Sen. Rodney Tom, chose not to seek reelection this year. Democratic Rep. Cyrus Habib is leading over Republican Michelle Darnell in the race to replace Tom, 63 to 37 percent.

In the 28th Legislative District, Republican Sen. Steve O’Ban of Tacoma is leading with 56.5 percent of the vote over Democrat Rep. Tami Green of Lakewood, who had 44 percent. O’Ban was appointed to fill the seat following the death of Sen. Mike Carrell. The district includes parts of Lakewood, Tacoma and Joint Base Lewis-McChord.

Another closely watched race is taking place in Federal Way, where two candidates are vying to replace outgoing Democratic Sen. Tracey Eide. So far, Mark Miloscia, a former Democratic state Representative who is running as a Republican, is leading with 57 percent of the vote over Democrat Shari Song.

In Washington’s 4th Congressional District, two Republicans look poised to advance to the November election. Clint Didier and Dan Newhouse are the top two frontrunners in the bid to replace retiring Republican U.S. Rep. “Doc” Hastings. The crowded contest included a dozen contenders, including two Democrats, eight Republicans and two Independents.

Statewide, 123 legislative districts and ten congressional races are on the ballot — read the full results on the Secretary of State’s website here.

Categories: Election

On TVW: Pension funding council, fish hatchery lawsuit and Results Washington

By | July 28, 2014 | 0 Comments

TVW will be covering the following events live this week:

Monday, July 28 at 10 a.m.: TVW will be live on television and the web with the Pension Funding Council. The webcast will be streamed at this link.

Tuesday, July 29 at 10 a.m.: The Senate Natural Resources and Parks Committee is holding a work session on “recent state hatchery litigation and settlement.” The meeting will be broadcast live on television and on this link.

Wednesday, July 30 at 10 a.m.: TVW will live webcast Gov. Inslee’s “Results Washington” meeting on the economy at this link.

 

Categories: TVW

Gov. Inslee details plan for new clean water standards

By | July 9, 2014 | 0 Comments

Gov. Jay Inslee is proposing new clean water standards that are partly based on an assumption of how much fish Washingtonians eat each month.

Inslee’s plan would raise the state’s fish consumption rate from 6.5 grams a day — or about one serving of fish a month — to 175 grams a day, or about a serving of fish every day of the month. He said the new standard is more “realistic” and protects those who eat locally-caught fish as a regular part of their diet, including tribal members and recreational fishers.

The fish consumption rate is part of a formula that determines how much pollution can be discharged into the state’s waterways by factories, municipal sewage plants and other industries.

Businesses have previously opposed stricter water quality standards because of the high cost of upgrading equipment. Boeing on Wednesday issued a statement saying the proposed standard could result in “little to no improvement to water quality and be a substantial detriment to Washington jobs and economic health.”

As part of his plan, Inslee intends to send a proposal to the 2015 state Legislature that would reduce toxics in the water by targeting four chemicals: PCBs, phthalate plasticizers, toxic flame retardants and zinc.

Senate Republican Leader Mark Schoesler says any new standards must balance environmental benefits with protecting family budgets and jobs.

The Department of Ecology must come up with a preliminary draft rule that matches Inslee’s proposal by Sept. 30. The full package won’t be submitted to the federal Environmental Protection Agency until after the 2015 legislative session to allow for the passage of the toxic reduction bill, Inslee said.

Watch TVW video of the press conference below:

Categories: Uncategorized

First 24 marijuana licenses issued by state officials

By | July 7, 2014 | 0 Comments

The Washington State Liquor Control Board on Monday issued the state’s first 24 marijuana retail licenses to stores in cities that include Seattle, Spokane, Tacoma, Bellingham and Lacey.

The licenses pave the way for stores to begin selling pot as soon as 8 a.m. Tuesday morning. The full list of 24 stores is available online here, although not all stores are expected to have supply ready to go on the first day.

Cannabis City in Seattle told the Associated Press it will open its doors at noon Tuesday, while other stores say they will have “soft openings” in the coming days as they stock their shelves.

The board expects to eventually license 334 stores across Washington state.

Voters in Washington legalized marijuana during the November 2012 election. The state Liquor Control Board has spent 18 months establishing a system to produce, process and sell recreational marijuana.

A number of stores in small cities in Washington also received retail licenses Monday, including Ephrata, Kelso, Prosser, Camano Island and Bingen.

Categories: Marijuana

On TVW this week: Discussion about rules for ‘unstable slopes’ in wake of Oso mudslide

By | July 7, 2014 | 0 Comments

Here’s what TVW is covering live this week:

Monday, July 7 at 1 p.m.: TVW is live webcasting the first meeting of a joint legislative task force on “Economic Resilience of Maritime and Manufacturing.” The agenda is here, and TVW will live webcast the meeting at this link.

Tuesday, July 8 at 9 a.m.: TVW will be live on television and the web with a special meeting of the Forest Practices Board. In the wake of the deadly Oso mudslide, the board is considering new rules to “improve public safety and local and state coordination efforts for those living near unstable slopes.” It will also consider rules for aerial chemical spraying. The full agenda is available here, and TVW will webcast it at this link.

Wednesday, July 9 at 10 a.m.: TVW will be live on television and the web with the first meeting of a task force on nuclear energy. The meeting will be webcast at this link.

Wednesday, July 9 at 12 p.m.: Gov. Jay Inslee will hold a press conference to announce his proposal for updating the state’s clean water standards and fish consumption rate. TVW will live webcast the press conference at this link.

Categories: TVW

Drone task force set to meet Monday

By | June 26, 2014 | 0 Comments

TVW will be live at 9 a.m. on Monday, June 30 with the first meeting of the state’s drone task force.

Gov. Jay Inslee created the task force after vetoing House Bill 2789, which would have required public agencies such as police departments to obtain a warrant before using a drone, except during emergencies. It would have allowed public agencies to use drones for training, testing, wildlife and environmental monitoring.

Inslee asked the task force to examine the privacy concerns surrounding unmanned aerial vehicles, and to come up with proposed legislation for the 2015 session.

The Unmanned Aerial Systems Task Force meeting will be held from 9 am. to noon on June 30 in the ABC Conference Room of the Cherburg Building at the Capitol. The group is expected to meet four times this year.

TVW is producing a one-hour documentary this summer about drones — watch a short preview below on the latest edition of “The Impact:”

Categories: Drone, Governors Office

On ‘The Impact:’ New television ads warn smokers about driving while high

By | June 25, 2014 | 0 Comments

Traffic safety officials are launching a new television advertising campaign in July to warn people about the consequences of driving after smoking pot.

The state’s first retail marijuana stores are set to open on July 8, and the ads coincide with stepped-up DUI patrols that will begin on July 1.

The campaign features three 30-second television commercials produced by the Colorado Department of Transportation. The message of the ads: You can do a lot of things high, but don’t drive. Here’s an example:

On this week’s edition of “The Impact,” host Jennifer Huntley talks with Shelly Baldwin, a program manager with the Washington Traffic Safety Commission, about the new ad campaign.

Also on the show, find out about an upcoming change for registered domestic partners. Couples under the age of 62 who are registered domestic partners with the state will automatically become married on June 30. The change is part of the state’s 2012 law legalizing same-sex marriage.

More information about the conversion process is available online here.

“The Impact” airs on Wednesday, June 25 at 7 & 10 p.m.

Categories: Marijuana, TVW

Marijuana retail stores set to open July 8, but may not be selling edibles at first

By | June 24, 2014 | 0 Comments

Edible pot food such as brownies and candy likely will not be on the shelves when Washington’s first legal marijuana stores open their doors on July 8.

The Washington State Liquor Control Board is expected to adopt an emergency rule requiring prior approval of the labels that go on edibles before the pot-infused food can be sold at retail stores. (Update: The emergency rule was formally adopted by the board on Wednesday.)

The labels cannot feature cartoon figures or appeal to children. The packages must include scoring to show serving sizes, along with other requirements. Makers of pot-infused food can get approval for their products by submitting a photo of the package to the Liquor Control Board. If rejected, the board has an appeals process.

So far, no labels have been submitted to the board for approval. Twenty marijuana stores are expected to open on July 8, although the store locations have not yet been released.

In advance of the opening date, state officials are also launching a public campaign to dissuade anyone under the age of 21 from using marijuana. Gov. Jay Inslee said at a press conference Tuesday that the statewide campaign is “essential to protect the human health of our kids.”

“If we fail to act, this effort to legalize marijuana could be in some doubt,” Inslee said.

And it’s not just kids that the state is trying to educate. “One of our concerns is the adult consumers that maybe haven’t had marijuana in a long time, or are new users,” said Liquor Control Board Chair Sharon Foster.

‘The marijuana of today is not the marijuana of the ’60s,” warned Foster, who said she was told by an emergency room doctor that most marijuana-related cases are Baby Boomers.

Foster said the board is also trying to get out the message that people may have to wait up to two hours before they begin feeling the effects of edible pot food.

Edibles have come under scrutiny in Colorado after a 19-year-old student fell to his death from a hotel balcony after eating six pot cookies. Colorado is now weighing potency rules for edibles.

Watch the press conference below:

On TVW: Safety at marijuana stores, examination of criminal justice system

By | June 24, 2014 | 0 Comments

TVW will be live with several events on Tuesday, June 24, including:

10 a.m.: The governor’s Results Washington group will meet to discuss its “education” initiative. TVW will live webcast the meeting, which will cover topics such as early learning and the opportunity gap.

10 a.m.: The House Finance Committee is holding a work session on the fiscal sustainability of cities and counties. The agenda is available here, and TVW will live webcast the meeting at this link.

12:30 p.m.: TVW will be live on television and the web with a press conference by Gov. Jay Inslee, who will discuss public safety efforts as the state prepares to open its first recreational marijuana retail stores. Also speaking at the press conference will be Attorney General Bob Ferguson, Washington State Liquor Control Board Chair Sharon Foster, and State Health Officer Kathy Lofy. The press conference will be live streamed at this link.

2 p.m.: Inslee will sign an executive order creating the Justice Reinvestment Task Force, which will conduct a data-driven review of the state’s criminal justice system. Washington state was selected to be one of 22 states to participate in the U.S. Department of Justice’s Justice Reinvestment Initiative. Following the signing of the executive order, the task force will hold its first meeting. TVW will live webcast the event at this link, and it will be broadcast on television at a later time.

Categories: Governors Office, TVW

On ‘The Impact:’ Education funding, ferry water monitoring system

By | June 18, 2014 | 0 Comments

On Wednesday’s edition of “The Impact,” host Jennifer Huntley gets reaction from Representatives Ross Hunter, D-Medina, and Bruce Chandler, R-Granger, about the state Supreme Court’s latest order on education funding.

Plus, Carol Maloy of the Dept. of Ecology state ferry system describes a new partnership with scientists to learn more about the water in Puget Sound. A high-tech water monitoring device attached to the ferries measures the velocity of the water moving in and out of Puget Sound. It is currently in place on the “Salish” ferry, which crosses daily between between Port Townsend and Coupeville.

More information about the program can be found here.

Update: Watch “The Impact” below:

Categories: TVW

Hundreds of bills passed by Legislature set to take effect this week

By | June 10, 2014 | 0 Comments

More than 200 bills passed by the Washington State Legislature this year are set to go into effect on Thursday, including new laws dealing with tanning beds, religious holidays and the number of credits required for high school students to graduate.

Here is the full list of bills that passed and the date they take effect. Among those taking effect on June 12:

Religious holidays: State employees will be allowed to take two unpaid days off a year for religious reasons, and public school children will be excused for two days under Senate Bill 5173.

Military in-state tuition: Veterans and active duty military members will qualify for in-state tuition at Washington colleges and universities without having to first establish residency. Senate Bill 5318 waives the one-year waiting period for veterans, military members and their families.

Homeless fees: A $40 document recording fee that people pay during real estate transactions, such as buying or refinancing a house, is extended until 2019. The fee supports homeless shelters, affordable housing and other homeless programs.

24 credit diploma: Starting with the class of 2019, high school students will have to earn 24 credits for a diploma. The current minimum is 20 credits, although some school districts require more than the minimum. The bill also provides more opportunities for students to take career and technical classes that meet graduation requirements.

Tanning beds ban: Teenagers under the age of 18 will no longer be allowed to use tanning beds in Washington. Senate Bill 6065 bans minors from using tanning beds, unless they have a written prescription for UV radiation treatment from a doctor. Tanning salons will be fined $250 for violations.

Domestic violence: Washington residents under domestic violence restraining orders will be barred from owning guns. The bill says that someone who is under a protection, no-contact, or restraining order related to domestic violence must surrender his or her guns to law enforcement.

Many of the other bills passed by the Legislature this year take effect July 1, including a bill that bans minors from purchasing cough syrup that contains dextromethorphan.

Also beginning July 1, all adoptees over the age of 18 will have access to their original birth certificates unless a birth parent files a form declining to release the information. More information about the law and forms are available at the Dept. of Health website here.

Categories: Public Policy, TVW

On TVW: College bound scholarship, House Judiciary committee, Supreme Court

By | June 9, 2014 | 0 Comments

Here’s what TVW is covering this week:

1 p.m. Monday, June 9: TVW will live webcast the College Bound Scholarship Program Work Group meeting. The program was created by the Legislature in 2007. It gives low-income middle school students a chance to earn a scholarship to college if they sign a pledge to keep a 2.0 GPA, commit no felonies and apply for college financial aid. Watch the webcast at this link.

9 a.m. Thursday, June 12: TVW will be live on television with the House Judiciary Committee as they hold a work session on the recreational land use immunity statute. The work session will be immediately followed by a joint session with the House Public Safety and Judiciary committees on several items related to legal financial obligations. Both meetings will be live webcast at TVW.org.

9 a.m. Thursday, June 12: TVW will live webcast the Washington Supreme Court arguments in a case involving Regence BlueShield’s refusal to cover treatments for autistic children. A lower court found that Regence’s exclusion for treatments violates Washington’s Mental Health Parity Act of 2006. TVW will live webcast the arguments here.

10 a.m. Friday, June 13: TVW will be live on television with the state Clemency and Pardons Board. The board will hear from seven people who are seeking to commute or pardon their sentences.

 

Categories: TVW